It costs $42.50 to register for one ACT date without the Writing section included. It costs $58.50 with the Writing section included. There are a handful of extra charges that depend on circumstance, including registering late, sending scores to more than four colleges, changing test dates and more.

That's the cost of one ACT date. Most college-bound high schoolers, however, take the test more than once, multiplying the number of dollars spent on the four hour college readiness exam.

(Here are all of the upcoming ACT test dates.)

And that's just the cost of taking the test - whether once, twice, or three times. The ACT, as with the SAT, can play a major role in determining what colleges a high school senior can get into and how much they'll cost. Since raising an ACT score in the ballpark of just two or three points can unlock new opportunities for college, lots of families invest in ACT prep, which can cost money as well. We'll get into how much ACT prep costs below.

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First, here is every cost associated with the ACT:

Costs to Register for the ACT

(If you miss the late registration deadline for the ACT, you can still sign up during a Standby Request Period. Registering on Standby does not guarantee a seat on test day. If no seats are available, you’ll be refunded the $51.)

Register without writing section $42.50
Register with writing section $58.50
Re-register over the phone $15
(Re-registration over the phone is only available if you’ve already registered for the ACT.)
Register late $27.50
(Every ACT date has a regular registration deadline and a late registration deadline. You can see every 2017 ACT date here.)
Register for Standby Testing $51
Register internationally $51
Change test date $25
(When changing the ACT date you’ve registered for, you’ll be refunded the cost of the original date, and charged the cost of both the the new date and the $25 change fee.)
Change test center $25

Costs to Access ACT Scores and Send Them to Colleges

View score report online $0
(Multiple Choice scores are typically available online three weeks after the test date. You can see projected score release dates for the ACT here.)
Send scores to your high school $0
Send scores to up to four colleges $0
(For every test date, you can send your scores to up to four colleges for free. It costs $12 for each additional college per test date.)
Send scores to more than four colleges per test date $12 / additional college
Test Information Release $20
(Test Information Release provides all the multiple choice questions and answers from an ACT test. This information can be useful because access to questions of weakness on an ACT test day can help focus practice for the next test.)

Costs of Test Day Materials

Printed Admission Ticket $0
Photo ID $0
At least two #2 pencils and an eraser Typically provided by test center.
A calculator
Calculators are neither required for the ACT nor provided at test centers. However, calculators are permitted for the ACT Math section, and can helpfully speed up making basic calculations in that section. Here is the ACT’s policy on what calculators are allowed.

Am I Eligible for a Fee Waiver?

ACT Fee Waivers cover the cost of taking the ACT for some high school juniors and seniors. To qualify for a fee waiver, families must contact their high school guidance counselors. (Families can’t request Fee Waivers directly from the ACT.)

Here are the Requirements to Receive a Fee Waiver:

Here’s What a Fee Waiver Covers:

Here’s What a Fee Waiver Doesn’t Cover:

How Much Does ACT Prep Cost?

The cost that families pay for ACT prep ranges from $0 to in the thousands. That price varies based on the method of preparation. To decide what kind of prep makes sense for your family, consider two very important factors:

Based on your answers to those two questions, you’ll land on one (or more) of the following ACT prep methods: self-study online, self-study with a book, online prep courses, online 1-on-1 tutoring, and in-person tutoring. Lindsay Welch, of Testive’s Student Success Team, outlines each method here.