AP is a program from the College Board that offers advanced coursework to high school students to earn college credit, impact GPA, and bolster an academic transcript. The AP exam schedules for 2017 occur every May.

More specifically, the Advanced Placement exams take place during the weeks of May 1st through May 5th and May 8th through May 12th. Over the course of these two weeks in spring, each of the 33 subjects will be tested. The AP exam schedule is the same for all students across the U.S.

Listed below are the AP exam dates for students taking one or more tests this upcoming spring:

2017 AP Exam Schedule: Week One

Monday, May 1st
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • Chemistry
  • Environmental Science
  • Psychology
Tuesday, May 2nd
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • Computer Science A
  • Spanish Language and Culture
  • Art History
  • Physics 1: Algebra Based
Wednesday, May 3rd
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • English Literature and Composition
  • Japanese Language and Culture
  • Physics 2: Algebra-Based
Thursday, May 4th
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • United States Government and Politics
  • Chinese Language and Culture
  • Seminar
Friday, May 5th
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • German Language and Culture
  • United States History
  • Computer Science Principles
  • Studio Art
    (“Studio Art last day for coordinators to submit digital portfolios (by 8 p.m. EDT) and to gather 2-D Design and Drawing students for physical portfolio assembly. Teachers should have forwarded students completed digital portfolios to Coordinators before this date.” - College Board)

2017 AP Exam Schedule: Week Two

Monday, May 8th
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • Biology
  • Music Theory
  • Physics C: Mechanics
Afternoon (2 pm)
  • Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism
Tuesday, May 9th
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • Calculus AB
  • Calculus BC
  • French Language and Culture
  • Spanish Literature and Culture
Wednesday, May 10th
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • English Language and Composition
  • Italian Language and Culture
  • Macroeconomics
Thursday, May 11th
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • Comparative Government and Politics
  • World History
  • Statistics
Friday, May 12th
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • Human Geography
  • Microeconomics
  • European History
  • Latin

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Makeup Policy for AP Exam Dates

Does the cross-country league championship fall on the morning of your child's AP US History exam? Did your child wake up for the AP Music Theory exam running a 100 degree fever? Luckily, students can take their APs on makeup dates if necessary, with or without an extra cost of $45 depending on the circumstance.

2017 Late-testing AP Exam Dates

Wednesday, May 10th
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • Latin
  • Macroeconomics
  • Music Theory
  • Statistics
  • United States Government and Politics
  • United States History
  • Comparative Government and Politics
  • English Language and Composition
  • Environmental Science
  • French Language and Culture
  • Japanese Language and Culture
  • Microeconomics
Thursday, May 11th
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • Calculus AB
  • Calculus BC
  • Computer Science A
  • Human Geography
  • World History
  • Art History
  • Chemistry
  • European History
  • Physics 1: Algebra-Based
  • Spanish Language and Culture
Friday, May 12th
Morning (8 am) Afternoon (12 pm)
  • Chinese Language and Culture
  • English Literature and Composition
  • Italian Language and Culture
  • Physics 2: Algebra-Based
  • Psychology
  • Biology
  • Computer Science Principles
  • German Language and Culture
  • Physics C: Mechanics
  • Seminar
  • Spanish Literature and Culture
Afternoon (2 pm)
  • Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

When Should Your Child Take AP Classes?

Over the course of the first two years of high school, freshmen and sophomores may develop academic interests that inspire them to take an Advanced Placement course in the subject. This is the best time to think about AP subjects that your child might be ready to take at a more rigorous level.

When your child takes an AP course - whether as a freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior - depends on his or her ability to excel in the course, as students are allowed to take AP courses any year of high school.

Most students who take AP classes do so during junior year because they’re ready to handle the advanced material and they can still use AP classes to enhance their college applications.

Keep in mind - if your child takes APs during the second semester of senior year, his or her performance in those classes likely won’t impact admissions. Seniors must apply Regular Decision often by January 1st, submitting academic transcripts for consideration before second semester classes start. Seniors who apply Early Decision or Early Action often do so by November 1st, submitting transcripts even before first semester classes end.

AP Exams taken during senior year can, however, count towards earning college credit and advanced placement.

How Advanced Placement Classes Can Help You Earn College Credit and Advanced Placement

Students can earn both college credit and advanced placement by taking AP exams. What’s the difference between college credit and advanced placement, you might ask?

The ability to earn college credit and advanced placement depends on each college and your child’s exam scores. You can find the AP credit policy for each college at the College Board website.

There are three benefits of earning college credit and/ or advanced placement before stepping foot on campus:

1. Your child can more quickly dive into their academic area of focus during freshman year if the college offers advanced placement based on AP exam score.

2. If the college offers credit based on AP Exam scores, knocking out credits before entering college reduces the number of credits your child will need to graduate. This can save your family money on college tuition, especially for students who use AP credits to graduate early.

3. Your child can earn scholarship money with an AP Scholars Award, which is awarded based on AP Exam scores.

How to Submit AP Exam Scores to Earn Course Credit and/or Advanced Placement

Families must submit AP Exam scores to colleges through the College Board in order to earn course credit and/or advanced placement. While colleges will see AP classes on your child’s academic transcript, they will only see official exam scores required to earn credits through the College Board portal.

You can request that the College Board send AP Exam scores to colleges either on the test date, or after the test date, via a score report request. Colleges typically notify students of course credit and/or advanced placement earned over the summer.

How Advanced Placement Classes Affect GPA

The AP isn’t just an exam; it’s a challenging high school class. (⅓ of students who take an AP class elect not to take the exam in May.) Your child’s performance in an AP class contributes to their college admissions profile regardless of the AP Exam score.

The most concrete way that an AP class in high school affects your child’s chances of getting into college is the effect on GPA. Similarly to those in an honors class, grades earned in an AP class count for more points if your child’s school uses a weighted GPA, which is a GPA scale that accounts for class difficulty.

For example, a student who receives an A in AP US History has a weighted GPA of 5.0. A student who receives an A in Curriculum I US History has a weighted GPA of 4.0. On an unweighted GPA scale, both students have a GPA of 4.0.

You can learn more about the difference between weighted and unweighted GPA here.

How Advanced Placement Classes Can Bolster an Academic Transcript

A good grade in an AP class increases your child’s weighted GPA, which very directly improves his or her chances of getting into a particular college. However, beyond the effect on GPA, do AP classes improve your child’s transcript?

Here’s the simple answer:

Yes.

Jeff Rickey, Dean of Admissions at St. Lawrence University, says this in an interview with the New York Times:

“Selective institutions that perform a holistic review will first compare the courses the student has taken with the courses offered at the school. If A.P. courses are offered, we would expect to see A.P. courses on the transcript. If honors courses are the highest level, then we would expect to see them. Next, we will consider grades in the academic courses over the arc of the years, but also each year separately. That allows us to see performance over time and determine any trends. A downward trend is troubling when the evaluation is conducted. An upward trend tells another story. Finally, we will look for electives, which give us other hints about the student’s interests and may validate other parts of the student’s application.”

Here’s the more complicated answer:

Yes, but not always.

As Mr. Rickey touches on, course rigour is but one component of a diversified admissions profile.

If adding that one extra AP class stretches your child so thin that his or her overall GPA suffers, he or she has to skip varsity lacrosse try-outs, or he or she doesn’t have time to prep for the SAT or ACT, then it might do more harm than good.

How AP Classes Fit into the Bigger Picture of College Admissions

Pursuing the academic challenges of AP Classes impacts your child’s weighted GPA and academic transcript, two of the many factors that make an admissions profile. As we describe in The Ultimate College Prep Guide, your child’s admissions profile is a balance of the following factors: