The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Impact on SAT and ACT Testing

How Does the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Impact SAT and ACT Testing?

Updated as of 3/23/20

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted communities across the globe, and we all have a role to play in preventing the spread of this virus. At Testive our first priority is the safety and well-being of our students, so we want to ensure that you have the latest information. How does the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) impact SAT and ACT testing? In this blog post you will learn more about the SAT and ACT’s proactive decisions with prevention and containment measures.

Many test centers began closing out of concern for the spread of COVID-19 prior to the March 14 SAT. The College Board rescheduled some of those exams for other dates in March, and moved others to test centers that remained open. 

However, the level of caution has increased dramatically since then. The latest guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is that “large events and mass gatherings can contribute to the spread of COVID-19 in the United States,” and their official recommendation is that for the next 8 weeks, organizers “cancel or postpone in-person events that consist of 50 people or more.” How does the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) impact SAT and ACT testing? Read below:

How has COVID-19 Affected the SAT?

Accordingly, the College Board has announced that the May 2, 2020 SAT has been cancelled nationwide. They have also cancelled all tests that were rescheduled from March 14 to later in the month. As of now, the June 6, 2020 SAT is not yet cancelled, and the College Board has not announced what will happen with regard to school-based weekday tests. You can read more about the SAT and COVID-19 here: https://www.collegeboard.org/releases/2020/college-board-cancels-may-sat-response-coronavirus?excmpid=SM48-ED-CB-tw.

How has COVID-19 Affected the ACT?

The ACT has rescheduled the April 4, 2020 test to June 13, 2020 nationwide. Students who are registered for the April 4 test will receive an email informing them of the postponement, with instructions to register for the rescheduled test in June. They have not announced what will generally happen with school-based weekday tests yet. You can read more about the ACT and COVID-19 here: https://www.act.org/content/act/en/covid-19.html.

When Will I Be Able to Take the SAT or ACT?

We recommend that at this point you assume tests will proceed as planned this summer. This could still change, but what won’t change is that colleges and universities will continue to use the SAT and ACT as predictors of student academic success as part of their applications. If it is within the realm of possibility for you — given health, resources, and the upending of your work, school, and family life —  you should for the SAT and ACT so that you’re ready for success whenever you are able to take it. 

The Bottom Line:

  • March 14, 2020 SAT is cancelled.
  • March rescheduled SAT dates are cancelled.
  • May 2, 2020 SAT is cancelled.
  • April 4, 2020 ACT is postponed to June 13, 2020.
  • You should monitor your school-based weekday SATs and ACTs scheduled for this spring to stay up to date on whether they will go ahead as planned or not.
  • If possible, you should prepare, or continue to prepare for the SAT and/or ACT with the assumption that it will go forward this summer. 

COVID-19 has impacted all of us, and it will take all of us to ensure we get through this pandemic together. We hope that you, your family, and your friends are safe and healthy. If you would like to discuss your personal test preparation needs with Testive, we offer free consultation calls with our Student Success Advisors. We offer personalized, adaptive software and 1-on-1 online coaching for the SAT and the ACT.

By |2020-03-23T16:47:58+00:00March 16th, 2020|ACT, SAT, Uncategorized|

About the Author:

Ben is the Head of Learning at Testive. He graduated with a Bachelor’s in Philosophy from Yale University, then obtained his Master’s in Education from the Boston Teacher Residency at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He taught in Boston Public Schools and has five years of experience preparing students for success on the SAT and ACT.